Mating matters – Noldy Rust

The end of another weekend is nearing, and I am home from open homes and theatre practice. Too early to relax in the chair as Sam is still milking and I get the guilts if I’m relaxing and he is working. I can’t admit to those same guilts affecting me if Bev is working around the house, but then again I really think she does enjoy dusting, cooking and vacuuming, I mean I did buy her a new vacuum cleaner and a new steamer for cooking the broccoli so she has reason to be happy….However, I do think the safest option is to disappear into my little office and tap away on my keyboard for a few minutes, writing my overdue blog. Keeps me out of harm’s way and ensures that they all think I’m doing my bit to keep the world going around!

Out on the farm, things are ticking along nicely. Mating has been the focus in the past wee while and all went according to plan. We split the herd, ran the non-cyclers with bulls, or should I call them the ‘Nontailpaintrubbedoffers’ and had great results there again. The bulls did their job and we had about 85% went up in that lot in three weeks and 94% in the main herd, giving us a submission rate of 92% in three weeks. Scratchies, tail paint, vigilance and bull power! Makes a formidable mix. The second round has just come to an end and there are only around 2% that haven’t been up. Happy with the result, should be a good calving next year. However, we can’t count our chickens yet and we still don’t know how the non-return rate will end up by the time we finish mating. Three more weeks of bulls, then two weeks of short gestation AI, will see us close to Christmas and in time to finish mating just as Sam takes his Christmas leave.

In my last blog I was contemplating the use of Red Devon bulls over the heifers after they had been up to AI. In the end, we did go down this track. Beautiful, quiet Red Devons were bought and have been running with the heifers straight after we had inseminated them with recorded Jerseys. If we get 50% in calf to AI it will be an ok result, and if all the rest calve without intervention to the Red Devons, then we’re onto a winner. Well-grown heifers, easy-calving bulls with narrow shoulders, a vigilant farmer at calving time, all should be sweet!! I’ll be singing from the rooftops if all is well next calving, and conversely be avoiding the subject if we have some issues. However, I have confidence in my research…..

Grass growth has been consistent for the last couple of months, so we cut the feeding out right back to a bare minimum. The issue with a large stack face of maize and only feeding a couple of kilos DM per cow means that the face starts heating, even when inoculated with 11C33. For this reason, we buy in a unit or two of husk bales from Gisborne. Baled maize husks with crushed grain in them. This feed has an average ME of 10, is value for money, and is good to feed with a bit of PKE or the like. It’s really only a back-up if we hit a bit of a feed pinch. We find this works well and saves wasting maize owing to heating on the face. We closed the stack down properly this year, getting a digger in to pull the face down and give the front of the stack a good roll so that we could seal it properly with tyres touching. You may think that it’s a waste getting a digger in for that??? Our theory was that wasting feed is worse and it’s just so difficult to get a stack face to seal if its vertical. I hate opening a stack and seeing heaps and heaps of mould and gunge, a bit like opening that container that’s at the back of the fridge and been there for a few months….That reminds me, when Bev is finished vacuuming, she may want to clean the fridge out. I can’t help ‘cos I’m busy….

The last of the calves have headed up the road to their Garden of Eden, rolling in grass up there at Phil’s place, and achieving massive growth rates. It’s always nice to have well-grown calves go off grazing, knowing that they have had an excellent start in their pathway to cowhood….is that even a word?? Is now I guess! We’ll be up there monthly drenching them, for the next few months anyway, as it’s nice to see them grow. I had a bit of a brilliant idea to keep the last couple of calves for veal, keep them in the shed on milk for 4-5 months then send them on their big goodbye. This meat is really tender and easy to eat as we did this a couple of times years ago. However, I’m having second thoughts now as they look so fat and strong and healthy, and they’re so friendly, and they will grow so much more if we don’t send them on their big goodbye for another 16 months at least, and plus, I kind of like them!! So does Sam. And our young granddaughter! What would I tell Ainsley if she were to ask where Mr Speckle and Blackie have gone?? Hmmmm, maybe I’m getting soft.

So, from here on forward, it’s just business as usual in the lead up to summer. SustaiN is stockpiled in the shed, to be applied when the rain is nigh. Pasture spraying has been done and the farm looks nice and clean, a real credit to Sam. The pressure is now off on the farm, but the foot’s to the floor for another month in the real estate game. Plenty of listings are awaiting buyers and enquiry are steady. Open days and viewings, appraisals and contracts, are the order of the day, for the next wee while anyway. The payout forecast is good in the short to medium term, so it’s nice to have some positive news. Not to mention the beef price!! Whoa, that’s another good reason the let Mr Speckle and Blackie live a bit longer…they might pay for my ticket to Rarotonga next year….. Hmmm, holidays are now in my mind, I better sign off, my mind is wandering.

Ciao for now… Noldy

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